theyflysohigh : Steve Marsh

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Banner Hammers Logo theyflysohigh La Gantoise v. WHU Ticket 1965 Medal ECWC Team Group Away Spartak Real Zaragoza Flag Real Zaragoza Pennant Stade Olympique Postcard Spartak Pin La Gantoise Rosette La Gantoise Car Badge

European Cup Winners' Cup 1964-65

Competing teams...

Honved (Hungary), Lausanne Sports (Switzerland), Slavia Sofia (Bulgaria), Cork Celtic (Southern Ireland), La Gantoise (Belgium), West Ham United (England), Spartk Praha Sokolovo (Czechoslovakia), Anorthosis (Cyprus), Esbjerg (Denmark), Cardiff City (Wales), Sporting Lisbon (Portugal), Valetta (Malta), Real Zaragoza (Spain), Dundee (Scotland), Torino (Italy), Fortune Gallen (Holland), Skeid Oslo (Norway), Valkeakoskin Haka (Finland), A.E.K. Athens (Greece), Dinamo Zagreb (Yugoslavia), Steauna Bucharest (Rumania), Derry City (Northern Ireland), Aufbau Magdeburg (East Germany), Galatsaray (Turkey), Union Sportiv (Luxembourg), T.S.V. Munich (West Germany), Oporto (Portugal), Olympique Lyonnais (France)

LA GANTOISE (Belgium)

Preliminary Round - 1st Leg: Stade Jules Otten 1-0

23rd September 1964

64_09_23 La Ganotoise

Boyce

Att: 18,000

Standen

Bond

Peters

Bovington

Brown

Moore

Sealey

Boyce

Byrne

Hurst

Sissons

La Gantoise Crest

Player Memento

The Belguim club presented Car Plaques to the players as a souvenir of the match. This one belongs to Alan Dickie

Match Ticket

ECWC Trophy La Gantoise Pennant

The rosette and pennant were given to me by an elderly gentleman who had attended the Hammers European matches at Upton Park in the 60's

Hero Ron Boyce

breaks match deadlock

West Ham came home triumphant from their first crack at a coveted European Trophy – it was a victory gained first by sweat then by skill against 11 fighting part-timers. Even as 600 East London soccer fans made themselves heard above klaxons and horns and saluted victory here in Ghent the Boleyn heroes promised: “We can – and will – do better !” Manager Ron Greenwood – the man whose tactical knowledge fashioned this great Hammers triumph – told me: “We disappointed ourselves. But we did what we came to do keep a blank scoresheet against us for the return leg at home and win if possible. “Hammers hero was again East Ham grocer’s son Ron Boyce. He made it seem like Wembley all over again as he rose in the 52nd minute of this historic European Cup Winners Cup match to head home Alan Sealey’s corner. Boyce ended a defensive deadlock that had these two sides sparring like tense novice-boxers. Said Ron Greenwood “Blame me because of the tough build-up I gave my players. We were too anxious but perhaps this was better than going into our first European game expecting a push-over”. Ken Brown successfully recalled to centre-half was the first to admit: “Praise Ron for this. His special break-down of the Belgian team after seeing them only once before was just great. “I felt I knew their centre-forward before the game even started.” Hammers deservedly won a join the exclusive band of British clubs that have won away in a European cup-tie – a near impossible feat. Defensively they never looked like in trouble. Up front, they created chances without hitting anything like top form. Gantoise had speed, fitness and enthusiasm – but in the end they were poor substitutes fro West Ham’s more skilful method. Stars! Undoubtedly Bobby Moore and Martin Peters. Skipper Moore was magnificent. His head rose time and again to clear danger and his non-stop command from midfield rallied Hammers whenever they looked like losing their grip. Peters was a superb left-back. He switched there in a 1st minute change with Jack Burkett a touch viewer and almost twice sparked goal moves with intelligent fast – running. He almost scored himself with a flashing header. Speedy John Sissons was the best of an attack given little time to work together. But it was a great save by Jim Standen soon after Boyce’s goal that kept Hammers well on top. He dived to fingertip away a sudden shot from centre-forward Lambert and admitted after the game: “I thought it was in, I saw it so late !”. At the start, Hammers needed nearly all their defensive skill to keep out the eager Gantoise forwards. But when West Ham broke away they looked well able to score. Sissons had two great drives flash past the goal; Johnny Byrne almost converted a fine Peters pass and Hurst sent a strong header straight at the ‘keeper. But Hammers control, a brief moment of panic apart, was never in danger in the second half. West Ham already with a reputation for fair play – were voted the cleanest British team to come to Belgium at an after-the-game banquet in Ghent. Now Hammers go into the second leg at Upton Park on October 7. Their one goal up should be enough to see them into the last 16 of the Europe’s second top competition and on the road for European Gold.

LA GANTOISE (Belgium)

Preliminary Round - 2nd Leg: Boleyn Ground 1-1

7th October 1964 (agg 2-1)

64_10_07 La Gantoise

Dickie

Bond

Peters

Bovington

Brown

Moore

Brabrook

Boyce

Byrne

Hurst

Sissons

Byrne

Att: 24,000

HAMMERS MARCH ON

Thanks to Sissons

Either manager Ron Greenwood or secretary Eddie Chapman will now represent Hammers in Brussels for the European Cup Winners Cup draw. This was the news from the Boleyn camp late yesterday as West Ham licked their wounds after stumbling and fumbling their way into a place among the 16 “finalists” in Europe’s second greatest cup competition under the Boleyn lights. Whoever goes will carry with them the sad memory of 24,000 fed-up fans booing West Ham’s first European outing at home. An d when this much-heralded so disappointing game was all over the fans – many paying £1 for their seat – stayed to give ten-and-a-half fighting fit, but quite ordinary Belgians the biggest cheer of the night. For the part-timers from Ghent who arrived in London only 24 hours before the start and hardly trained, came near to shaming Hammers out of the cup. No wonder they hugged each other after the game. It was a moral victory. West Ham can rejoice on two points. They are through to the last 16 with a lesson learned from this first European venture and the chance to play better. The 24,000 gate at raised admission prices set a Boleyn receipts record, beating the previous best of £5,192 for a cup tie against Arsenal in 1930. But manager Ron Greenwood who said before the game: “We shall seek quick goals to build on our lead established in Ghent,” was a disappointed man. Just how important that Ron Boyce goal on a foggy night in Ghent proved to Hammers was seen when the “quick goals” never came. It wasn’t until well into the second half that Hammers established any sort of command over the plucky Belgians who trained for this match on raw meat and coffee. Hammers hit La Gantoise with everything in the first half. They swept down on the 40-year-old Seghers in goal like buzzing bees – and emerged goalless and minus their sting. The chances were there – at least five golden, gilt-edged chances – but they were either frittered away by some fantastically bad shooting or the do-everything-wrong-and-get-away-with-it charmed life of Seghers. Byrne, Hurst, Boyce and Moore missed “sitters” and then Gantoise – banking on defence to see them to smash-and-grab victory sprang clear to level the first leg lead with the softest of goals. And it was a tragedy for 20-year-old goalkeeper Alan Dickie hurled into this European hot-bed just 30 minutes before the kick-off because of injury to Standen. He failed to call as Peters met a Storme cross and was way out of position as Peters unwittingly turned the ball into his own net trying to pass back. Two minutes before half-time Hammers went ahead. Brilliant Sissons – surely he must play for England after this outstripped his back in a great run and crossed superbly low and fast for Byrne to run the ball in for his 14th goal of the season. West Ham never looked like establishing a superiority that should have brought a goal feast. Key men Bobby Moore and Ron Boyce were way below form, Byrne and Hurst ruined their own link up by woeful passing and only Sissons continued to trouble the Belgians, reshuffled after the first half injury to centre back Denayer. Hammers have always learned from their mistakes in the past. They are still a too-talented side not to learn from this narrow escape from an inglorious European exit.

64_10_07 La Gantoise ticket 01 64_10_07 La Gantoise ticket 02 64_10_07 La Gantoise ticket 03

Match Tickets

ECWC Trophy Button

CLICK TO CONTINUE THE ADVENTURE

SPARTAK PRAHA SOKOLOVO (Czechoslovakia)

SPARTA PRAGUE

First Round - 1st Leg: Boleyn Ground 2-0

25th November 1964

64_11_25 Spartak Praha

Bond, Sealey

Att: 27,590

Standen

Bond

Burkett

Bovington

Brown

Peters

Sealey

Boyce

Bryne

Hurst

Sissons

64_11_25 Spartak Prague Ticket

Match Ticket

Did you know...

The gate was 27,590 and receipts £10,600 – a ground record. Spartak had eighty fans flown over from Prague to cheer them – the first time Czech supporters have been allowed to leave the country.

Image courtesy of Simon Lord

SEALEY GOAL RAPS CZECHS – Seals cup lead.

Alan Sealey smashed home the most vital goal of his West Ham career under the Boleyn lights. It came eight minutes from the end. It smashed down for a second time on this glory night the seemingly impregnable wall Spartak flung across their goal. And it has probably clinched Hammers a place in the last eight of Europe’s second greatest soccer competition. But now goal hero Sealey could be the man left out of the team when West Ham go to Prague determined to build on their slender two goal lead at all costs in the second leg of the Cup Winners Cup. Boleyn manager Ron Greenwood may well decide on a 6-2-3 defensive line up to combat Spartak’s certain policy of all out attack. And that could mean an extra defender brought in and playing only four, possibly three, forwards. The target was a minimum lead of two goals, Hammers hit that target. For moments in the first half it looked as though Hammers would falter in the tough test. They probed and picked at Spartak’s almost brutal eight man “iron curtain” without smashing it. But from an edgy, tense start they began to flow. The attack, which had raised only two first half shots, surged forward backed by the magnificent wing half play of Martin Peters and full backs Bond and Burkett, “freed” of defensive duties by Spartak’s keep-them-out obsession on defence. Sissons was superb, his individual brilliance – always allied to team work and Hammers’ match plan – tore huge gaps down Spartak’s right flank. Byrne, at his brilliant best, sparkled mid-field, his superb ball control creating openings with deftness and artistry. But it took the bludgeon boot of big John Bond to send 27,590 fans roaring the first goal salute. The ball came to him knee-high 30 yards out as an in-direct free kick was half cleared. And there was Bond blasting back a wonder shot which had the magnificent Kramerlus clutching air in a vain dive. Fifty seven minutes gone, 33 to go – and the heat on Spartak. Burkett crashed a Sissons pass inches wide, Byrne tricked three men in eye-dazzling dribble and hooked the ball at Kramerlus who seconds later rose like an eagle to flick a Peters lob over the bar.   That vital, necessary second goal still seemed a marathon distance away. Byrne flashed a pass to Boyce on the left wing. A quick first-time flick, a stabbed boot by Sealey and the ball agonisingly hit the post. Then Sealey, the man who turned the jeers to cheers, was pouncing like a panther to smash in the rebound with an unstoppable left foot shot. Will two goals be enough in Prague? Hammers work, accomplished here with fire and method, is not over. They must play with the same dedication to stop Spartak scoring there as they did here to score themselves. I think they will do it.

Sparta Spartak Photo Card and Pin Spartak Photo Card and Pin back

First Round - 2nd Leg: Letna Stadium 1-2

9th December 1964     (agg 3-2)

64_12_09 Spartak A

SPARTAK PRAHA SOKOLOVO (Czechoslovakia)

SPARTA PRAGUE

Sparta Spartak Praha Ticket

Sissons

Att: 24,000

Standen

Bond

Burkett

Bovington

Brown

Peters

Sealey

Boyce

Byrne

Hurst

Sissons

Match Ticket

Image courtesy of Simon Lord

CZECHS FAIL TO

CHECK GREAT HAMMERS

A Hundred-and twenty fervent fans were singing West Ham’s battle song “Bubbles” all over the sad silent city that is Prague. It was a salute to 11 West Ham heroes who for 87 minutes smashed the challenge of the Czechs. Despite that 2-1 scoreline, West Ham are through to the quarter final of Europe’s second greatest competition. Now they must be considered favourites to follow Spurs and bring the Cup Winners Cup back to England. Nobody in the Czechoslovakian capital – certainly none in the 40,000 packed National Stadium – gave them a chance in this second leg. They were almost right, but they reckoned without the Boleyn boys’ superb planning and great fighting spirit. Hammers great and gallant defence at last gave way under the tremendous strain of a fantastic Spartak finish and the Czechs produced a goal just three minutes from time. But it wasn’t enough. Hammers did their early work too well. It took a disciplined and highly skilled team to achieve this. No team could have played better or harder. They were inspired by the determination of skipper Ken Brown, untiring Ron Boyce – he was the shock “mopper up” in the best Bobby Moore style, John Sissons, who will never score a more vital goal, and Jim Standen whose 35th minute penalty save almost knocked the heart out of Spartak. Spartak, almost brutal in their fury to score that vital goal, pounded at West Ham’s defence. But with one move, a typical break from defence, it was West Ham who sent the fans delirious with joy with a goal in the 16th minute. It was the goal which for all the effort, tragedy and heartache that followed, won this tie for West Ham. It happened like this. Byrne raced clear, was felled by Tichy but went around him and crossed to Sissons. The left winger seemed to delay his shot – then lashed the ball high into the net. Hammers planned to hold Spartak for 20 minutes and, if possible, to score the first goal themselves. They lined up with Ken Brown at No.3 Jack Burkett four, Eddie Bovington five, and playing Boyce behind the entire defence. And it was Boyce who twice rescued Hammers from Spartak’s opening onslaught. But it was goalkeeper Jim Standen who finally silenced the home roars. He made brilliant saves from Mraz and Masek, but his greatest moment came in the 35th minute when he brilliantly saved a penalty by Mraz after a harsh hand ball decision against John Bond. It was all Spartak, but they seldom created a clear chance. Each West Ham defender stuck to his pre-match role and it took brutal tackles on Peters and Sissons to stop West Ham adding to their lead before half-time. It seemed as if nothing could stop Hammers’ victory. Then tragedy came in the 68th minute. Standen could only push a shot against the bar and as the ball dropped down Masek rushed in to shoot the ball home with Ron Boyce confidently expecting Standen to collect the ball again. It was Boyce’s only mistake in a great display. But it plunged Hammers, until then, completely in command into a backs-to-the-wall fight. Like men who have given everything and an give no more they cracked again. Mraz nipped in to score from a defensive error and Hammers fought out the last three minutes which must have seemed all agony. But they can rest assured there’ll be nothing but praise for this performance. They were virtually reduced to 10 men in the second half when Alan Sealey, who received a three inch gash below the left knee was taken to hospital after the game for seven stitches.

Spartak Wine Glass

The Czech hosts presented each of the Hammers party with a set of 6 Wine Goblets as a souvenir of the match, this one belongs to Alan Dickie

Player Memento

Eddie Bovington's stick pin, these were given to the players as a souvenir of the match.

LAUSANNE - SPORTS (Switzerland)

Lausanne Sport Badge

Second Round - 1st Leg: Stade Olympique - Pontaise 2-1

16th March 1965

LAUSANNE - SPORTS (Switzerland)

Lausanne Sport Badge

Quarter-Final - 2nd Leg: Upton Park 4-3

23rd March 1965     (agg 6-4)

65_03_16 Lausanne Sports v. WHU ECWC Lausanne Sports Ticket

Dear, Byrne

Att: 20,000

Standen

Kirkup

Peters

Boyce

Brown

Moore

Sealey

Hurst

Byrne

Dear

Sissons

GLORY MEN HEAD FOR LAST 4

West Ham went into their newest and toughest European soccer test geared, primed and prepared for draw. They emerged with a victory as massive as the snow-capped Alps which dwarfed the Lausanne soccer bowl. They did it through the brash innocence of Brian Dear – the 21-year-old “reserve” who could never have expected to play here 76 hours before. They did it through the magnificent 53rd minute goal of sheer cheeky brilliance of centre forward Johnny Byrne which had 500 Boleyn fans splitting the Swiss night air with a triumphant salute to greatness. These two by their goals smashed the sauntering Swiss on their own ground and put Hammers within what should be a formal 90 minutes of a Cup Winners Cup Semi-Final – a feat won only by Spurs since the competition attained the huge 30-club proportions of today. But they were the executioners in a mighty team show which again belongs to the blueprint masterminding of manager Ron Greenwood and the ability of his talented team. Once again like a phoenix rising from the ashes of constant league failure they proved bigger than the occasion and marched off to a triumphant salute from 25,000 Lausanne fans. It would have been fair reward for their courage and ability if they had gone into the second leg with a two goal margin. Nothing seemed more certain ten minutes from the end of this tingling tactical tussle. Then Martin Peters – this cool young soccer artist – made a mistake which did not seem possible amid the wealth of cultured defensive play. He aimed an indecisive clearance in his own packed 18 yard box from Eschmann’s cross and Hosp pounced to stab a low shot wide of Standen. It was a touch of almost cocky arrogance that manager Ron Greenwood will not gloss over before the return leg. If Hammers heed this lesson they must safely land a place in the last four. For team work, courage and skill they were ahead of a strong Lausanne side which for only the first 20 minutes and the last ten were allowed to look the Swiss champions they almost certainly will be. Hammers sat up late on Monday night planning this win over a Lausanne side which boasted eight full internationals and an unbeaten home record. The Boleyn men had come too far too quickly to be halted by reputation. For 25 minutes they held Lausanne from that vital quick goal – but it was a struggle, Peters rescued them once when Standen failed to hold a Hertig shot, Armbruster rattled the bar from 18 yards and flying Dutchman Kerkoffs flashed a rising shot inches wide. Then Dear cheekily flicked in an “offside” goal and sent confidence soaring. They deserved the slice of luck which made the vital 33rd minute first goal possible. Boyce smashed an indirect free kick over the Lausanne wall. Goalkeeper Kunzl could have let the ball crash into the net. Instead he tried to catch it, dropped it and Dear incredibly wriggled the ball back under his body. And West Ham who came here by tradition to defend were suddenly by skill attacking on European soil. Passes, previously

hesitant, flowed with thrust and meaning. Claret and blue shirts flitted in and out

of spaces with a new menace. The West Ham “wall” of top-form Bobby Moore

playing behind the four-man line of Kirkup, Boyce, Brown and Peters suddenly

broke free from the shackles of defence. Hurst – a dynamic figure in a half back

role – emerged as the power man as Hammers moved out in great waves of

attack. But it was from almost on their own goal-line that Hammers snatched that

so vital second goal. Moore cleared a delayed free kick to Dear who touched it back

to Byrne. Jinking Johnny raced over 60 yards leaving a trail of grounded defenders in

his wake, held off a final tackle and clipped a shot which Kunzl touched but could

not stop. A glorious goal. And when Lausanne came back at the end, Kirkup’s superb

headwork to clear menacing centres, Moore’s coolness and Brown’s resistance

all boosted tired Hammers – with Sisson’s limping badly – through to a surely certain

semi-final place.

Match Ticket

Image courtesy of Adam Summers

ECWC Musical Ornament 2

Player Memento

Player Memento

For this European - tie the Hammers contingent were each given a Musical Ornament as a souvenir of the match, this one was presented to Alan Dickie

Moore Dear Byrne airport ECWC Ghent DAN AIR Ticket Switzerland Leaflet Lausanne resort leaflet

Adam Summers European memorabilia including Air Ticket, resort and travel information and Stadium postcard

POSTCARD: STADE OLYMPIQUE

65_03_23 WHU  v. Lausanne Sports ECWC

Dear 2, Peters, o.g.

Att: 31,780

Standen

Kirkup

Peters

Boyce

Brown

Moore

Sealey

Hurst

Byrne

Dear

Sissons

DEAR DESTROYS SWISS

Fans Salute Lausanne as Hammers go into semi-final

Ronnie Boyce, Martin Peters, Bobby Moore and Johnny Byrne, the four strong men of West Ham on this glory night, could become the four-strong men of England’s World Cup Squad. These bright young Hammers - the pick of the Boleyn pops in a match of a hundred shots, a hundred thrills and a hundred memories – stamped England class all over this mighty match against a Lausanne side which came here without chance and trooped off to a 31,000 fan salute. Boyce at right half, was the immaculate master as this night lifted the defensive shackles – and the lid – off European Cup soccer. Peters, a gem of a display, looked the complete full-back and stormed Hammers into a 3-2 lead with a glorious header. Moore, after an indifferent start, grew in splendour and poise as these slick Swiss matched Hammers ball for ball, and almost goal for goal. Byrne was the great individualist who used his wonderful talent to link defence and attack with inspired dribbles or slide-rule passes. In a game of magnificent moments – Dear’s two superbly taken goals. Eachmann’s unforgettable bicycle kick which left Jim Standen rooted in disbelief – they were the men who kept Hammers – at times an outmatched Hammers – hanging grimly to the vital goal lead they had snatched in Lausanne. It’s almost impossible to clock the tally of shots, near misses and superb soccer which flowed from two superbly fit teams dedicated to attack. For Hammers their one goal lead was not enough. They had to attack – and did in a fantastic opening burst which saw Geoff Hurst twice rattle the woodwork, brilliant ‘keeper Kunzl save splendidly from Dear, luckily from Byrne and these ten feet tall Lausanne defenders kick a volley of shots clear. For Lausanne attack was the only hope. They forced three corners in 30 seconds, survived Hammers blitz and came back with a goal, brilliantly headed by Kerkoffs in 36 minutes from a cross by the tall giant Durr. Then tragedy for the fighting Swiss. Sealey aimed a low cross and Tacchella deflected the ball past Kunzl in the 41st minute. And on the stroke of half time the irrepressible Dear notched an incredible goal. Kunzl turned another low Sealey drive away and as Dear chased hopefully, the ball seemed certain to go over the bye-line. Then Dear from an impossible angle, was soaring it high into the net. But Lausanne were not finished, Hertig robbed Kirkup and blasted high into the net within minutes of the break and Standen somehow saved a Kerkoffs shot with his legs. But Hammers again applied extra-pace to outrun slow-it-down Lausanne, Peters surged them ahead from Sealey’s corner kick – and set the scene for a fantastic finale. Hosp smashed a shot against the bar and minutes later the ground erupted at Eschmann’s brilliant over head kick made it 3-3. Then came Dear’s winner – as near full time as his first had been near half time. And Lausanne, proud, vainly protesting were irretrievably out and West Ham on the verge of greater glory.

REAL ZARAGOZA CLUB DEPORTIVO (Spain)

Semi-Final - 1st Leg: Upton Park 2-1

7th April 1965

Dear, Byrne

Att: 35,000

Standen

Kirkup

Burkett

Peters

Brown

Moore

Boyce

Dear

Byrne

Hurst

Sissons

ONE-UP – BUT HOPING

West Ham’s great record in away-from-home European Cup soccer this season and a rekindling of courage and conviction can put them into the Cup Winners Cup Final at Wembley in May. They go to Spain for the second leg of this semi-final with a pencil-slim one goal lead instead of the two they had planned and hoped for. Is it enough against these underrated Spaniards who came to Upton Park desperately hoping to keep the margin to a one goal – and succeeded? For in the steamy cauldron that will be the Zaragoza Bowl for the return, Hammers must restore the faith of their fans – a faith they destroyed in a frustrating second half display at Upton Park. Zaragoza, riddled and rattled by West Ham’s glorious first half football, bounced back under the Boleyn lights to turn a decisive two goal margin into a victory chance 2-1 score. They were just as Hammers manager Ron Greenwood said they would be: Tough and uncompromising in defence, quicksilver, lethal destroyers in attack. Hammers played badly after the break. But credit these soccer senors for a fine comeback. At half time it looked all over. Hammers had sprung the trap brilliantly with two superb goals. Battling Brian Dear gloriously headed the first from an accurate Sissons cross in the 9th minute. Deft Johnny Byrne – the only Hammers forward to match the ball control of the Spanish attackers – rifled the second in the 24th. It was a great goal started by Moore with a pass to Ken Brown, forsaking the magnificent Marcelino to lurk on the right wing. His pass to Sissons was flicked on to Byrne and the England forwards smashed a great first time drive past the prancing Yarza. Before and after Dear and Sissons flashed wicked-looking shots inches over… and the Spaniards gave a hint of what was to come when Marcelino shot wide and Canario almost scored. And it was the brilliant Canario who inspired the fighting Spaniards. In 53rd minute he hit the post from the right. In 54th he shattered Hammers confidence and complacency with a goal, jinking past the at fault Moore and shooting for Standen to scoop the ball back into his own net. The Spanish defence which had booted with the thunder of a Fourth Division team in the first half grew more confident as Hammers, desperately needing goals, faltered and slid inexplicably back on defence. The giant Santamaria inspired some superb defensive play which Hammers’ two and never more than three pronged attacks could not break down. Boyce had a magnificent chance to make it 3-1 and slashed wide. Canario had a better chance to lay on the equaliser and shot high into the silent crowd. Ken Brown has never played better for West Ham. He always matched the masterly Macelino in the air. And the 35,000 fans who paid a record £13,000 gate receipts to cheer Hammers rose like a man to applaud the Spaniards at the close. For Hammers there were only boos… and hope. West Ham manager Ron Greenwood: “Disappointing after getting two early goals. The Spaniards played better as the game went on and were as good as I thought they would be. “It was the toughest game we have played since I have been manager here.” Zaragoza manager Rogue Olsen: “I am very pleased. But West Ham are a good side and we do not expect an easy game on our ground.”

REAL ZARAGOZA CLUB DEPORTIVO (Spain)

Semi-Final - 2nd Leg: Estadio de la Romareda 1-1

28th April 1965   (agg: 3-2)

Flag and Pennant Souvenir from John Northcutt's European travels

Sissons

Att: 28,000

Standen

Kirkup

Burkett

Peyers

Brown

Moore

Boyce

Sealey

Hurst

Dear

Sissons

No programme was issued for the game in Spain

SISSONS MAKES THOSE

SENORS SO SAD

Boleyn wall holds firm

West Ham will be back in the tough, money-spinning European Cup Winners’ Cup next season. That’s my prediction after watching these courageous Boleyn boys smash the challenge of Spanish aces Zaragoza into their own lush turf in a great semi-final. Hammers, primed in planning, fashioned in sheer courage, won their way back to Wembley for the second time in a year. But they won’t know their rivals for May 19th until Wednesday when Torino and Munich – drawing 3-3 after two games play off in Lausanne. And 10 of the guts-and-glory Hammers brigade will almost certainly be there to weigh up the opposition. Delighted manager Ron Greenwood said minutes after the victory. “I cannot go myself but it will be a wonderful opportunity for the lads to see the opposition at first hand.” Missing players will be skipper Bobby Moore who leads England against Hungary that day. This was Moore’s match. He was brilliant in the air and a human dynamo on the ground, inspiring and fortifying the magnificent rear-guard action which dented and finally destroyed what’s probably Europe’s best club forward line. As vital minutes ticked away Zaragoza’s Magnificent Five in attack were reduced to frustration and dejection by the Glorious Six of West Ham’s defence which never lacked help from Geoff Hurst and non-stop Ron Boyce, wearing a No.7 shirt. Hammers built a barricade across their goal. It was blitzed but besieged but never broken in a fantastic first half. Zaragoza unbeaten at home and needing a quick goal to cut back West Ham’s 2-1 lead were allowed only three clear chances despite all their brilliant attacking and the magnificent inspiration of inside-left Villa. They swarmed like white ghosts time and again to the edge of the penalty box. Then they foundered like the great Armada on the West Ham wall. They were forced to hit long-range shots which nearly always cleared the bar. Standen made a magnificent diving save from Marcelino but it was left winger Lapetra who made 30,000 Zaragoza fans roar as un-lucky Standen pushed out a Marcelino header in the 23rd minute and he was on spot to score from close range. Lepetra should have scored again before half-time, but the massacre forecast by Zaragoza fans and officials never came. And it was the brilliant Spaniards who were tiring at half-time as their efforts to build a lead were dented time and again. With nine minutes of the second half gone, a faster-looking West Ham were back in the game. They scored a gem of a goal – a typical counter attack from defence. Peters deflected a pass to Dear who slid a wonderful through ball to John Sissons. And the man Boleyn fans were jeering a week ago again became the hero as he raced brilliantly down the middle and placed a right foot shot past Yarza. West Ham still had to play it safe. Marcelino curled a shot inches wide and strong centre-half Ken Brown headed a Canario shot off the line. But Zaragoza, dejected and frustrated, had run out of speed and brilliance. There was nothing left to stop Hammers marching on to the final place their courage and skill deserve.

65_03_23 WHU v. Lausanne ECWC Pirate 65_03_17 WHU v. Lausanne ECWC

Pirate Programme

65_04_07 WHU v. Real Zaragoza ECWC 65_04_07 WHU v. Real Zaragoza Pirate 65_04_07 WHU v. Real Zaragoza Ticket Real Zaraboza Ticket

The Hammers line-up at the Letna Stadium

Spain postcard Spain Leaflet

Images courtesy of Adam Summers

POSTCARD: CITY CENTRE

TSV MUNCHEN 1860 (West Germany)

Final - Wembley Stadium, London 2-0

19th May 1965

65_05_19 WHU v. TSV Munchen 1860 ECWC Final

Sealey 2

Att: 97,974

Standen

Kirkup

Burkett

Peyers

Brown

Moore

Boyce

Sealey

Hurst

Dear

Sissons

1965 ECWC Shirt

Autographed Wembley Programme

WHU v. TSV Munchen 1860 Ticket La Gantoise Air Ticket

We're going on a European Adventure ...

Support material courtesy of Richard Miller and John Northcutt