theyflysohigh : Steve Marsh

Welcome to the Private memorabilia collection of 'theyflysohigh'

Insert body text here ...

Insert body text here ...

email:  theyflysohigh@btinternet.com

Banner Hammers Logo theyflysohigh Docklands Charity trophy cabinet JOC Trophy Cabinet Hospital Cup 1923-24 trophy cabinet 1923 FA Cup Finalists Back BLUE 1923 FA Cup Finalists Front BLUE

1920 - 1930 Trophy Cabinet ...

LONDON CHALLENGE CUP FINAL (LFA)

London F.A. Final 1930

West Ham United v. Brentford

Final at Highbury Stadium

5th May 1930 (2-1)

WEST HAM J.O.C. v. BIRMINGHAM J.O.C.

The third annual match between West Ham and Birmingham J.O.C.’s took place at Upton Park 30 March 1929. The two previous games have resulted in a draw at West Ham, 1-1 and a win for West Ham J.O.C. by 4-1 on the Villa ground. The JUVENILE ORGANISATIONS COMMITTEE takes charge of a lad’s football from the time he leaves school until he is old enough to take his place in top grade football.

A. SAUNDERS

(Birmingham)

West Ham United medal commemorating promotion to Division One and F.A. Cup final appearance in 1923.

The obverse with enamel club crest and inscribed

 

F.A. CUP FINALISTS 1923, MEMBERS OF 1ST. DIV. FOOTBALL LEAGUE,

the reverse inscribed WEST HAM UNITED

Website image LFA Glass Shelftop Glass Shelftop

1930 London Challenge Cup

Frank Piercy

F.A. CUP FINALISTS 1923

Members of 1st Division

Football League

F.A. CUP FINALISTS 1923 Members of 1st Division Football League

Frank Piercy spent more than 20 years with West Ham after joining the Hammers from his home town club, Middlesbrough, in 1904 - the year in which the Irons left their old Memorial Recreation Ground in Canning Town and moved into their new gleaming new stadium, the Boleyn Castle, later Boleyn Ground.

 

Between 1904 and 1911, tough-tackling defender Piercy, a former blacksmith, made 214 Southern League appearances for the Hammers. For four years betweeen 1907 and 1911 he was West Ham's captain.

 

He was banned for four weeks in 1907 after a fight with Swindon Town star, Charlie Bannister, who was also banned for six weeks for starting the fight. Piercy was in trouble again later that season when he tackled a Millwall player who "left the field in an unconscious state".

 

Injuries forced Frank to quit playing in 1912, and he became West Ham's assistant trainer. He was with the club when they were admitted to the Football League in 1919 and when, in 1923 they reached the first-ever F.A. Cup final staged at the newly built £800,000 Wembley Stadium.

 

Born: Haverton Hill, Stockton-on-Tees July 6, 1880. Frank died June 5, 1931 aged 50

Frank Piercy

In 1931 for the first and only time in the club’s history, West Ham United posthumously awarded a testimonial game for one of their loyal servants.

Click the Picture Link

PIERCY Framed

Norfolk & Norwich Hospital Cup

The Norfolk & Norwich Hospital Cup was a Charity invitation match organised by Norwich City and founded by public subscription in 1903. This annual end of season event raised money for charity and local communities.

 

Local side CEYMS F.C. (Church of England Young Men’s Society) having competed against Norwich City for the first three years decided to ‘retire’ from the competition in 1907 which led to the Hospital committee deciding to invite various first division teams to compete for the trophy against Norwich City, Everton being the chosen team to face the Canaries at their Newmarket Road enclosure in 1907. The Toffee’s were prize opposition for City, having won the FA Cup the previous season, a 1-1 draw resulted with the charity fund the winner as 9,500 were in attendance.

 

The precedent had been set to invite the country's very best to this challenge and thereby giving the Canaries’ supporters the opportunity to see the very best sides of the day.

 

 

 

Glass Shelftop

Norfolk & Norwich Hospital Cup

West Ham United were F.A. Cup finalists in the first Wembley final and clinched promotion to the Football League First Division in the same 1922-23 season, the Hammers would have been a top attraction at that time and were invited to compete at ‘The Nest’ on 5 May 1924.

 

A hat-trick by West Ham’s top marksman Vic Watson and another by Campbell secured a 4-3 victory with this medal belonging to Syd Bishop.

 

The Hammers line-up included William Kaine, William Henderson, Jack Young, Syd Bishop, George Kay, Albert Cadwell, William Edwards, Vic Watson, John Campbell, William Moore and James Ruffell.

The last Norfolk & Norwich Hospital Cup game was played on 2 May 1960 when the Canaries played Southampton.

 

The original trophy however came to a sad end when it was lost in a fire, at Norwich City’s Carrow Road ground 25 October 1985.

London Combination Champions

CAN YOU HELP?

Medal image required

Glass Shelftop

London Combination Champions

With the end of the First World War and the return of the Football League programme of fixtures, the London Combination was previously competed for by first team players and from this campaign  the Hammers fielded a 'Reserve' team. West Ham United's second-string won the 36 League fixture programme with a record of: Won: 20, Drawn: 9, Lost: 7, Goals for: 69, Goals against: 41 and 49 points. Queens Park Rangers were in second place with 45 points.

Trophy Cabinet Pratt

F.A. CUP FINALISTS 1923

Members of 1st Division

Football League

West Ham United medal commemorating promotion to Division One and F.A. Cup final appearance in 1923.

The obverse with enamel club crest and inscribed

 

F.A. CUP FINALISTS 1923, MEMBERS OF 1ST. DIV. FOOTBALL LEAGUE,

the reverse inscribed FR PRATT DIRECTOR

Glass Shelftop

F.A. CUP FINALISTS 1923 Members of 1st Division Football League

Glass Shelftop

Juvenile Organisations Committee

Dockland Settlements

West Ham United v. Tottenham Hotspur

Upton Park

17 March 1924

Tommy Hampson, William Henderson, Jack Young, Syd Bishop, George Kay, Alabert Cadwell, William Edwards,

Jim Collins, John Campbell, William (Billy) Moore, Jimmy Ruffell

Charlie Paynter

Dockland Settlements were a network of amenity centres in deprived areas of London, intended to meet the social and spiritual needs of the local population at a time when there was no public provision of such services. The settlements originated in 1894 under the leadership of Reginald Kennedy-Cox and continued to serve their communities with a variety of social, sporting and cultural facilities. The Dockland Settlements are still functioning today, well into the 21st century.

 

In their formative years West Ham United were not a rich club by any means and those who were associated with the club in the early 1920’s, whether players or directors realised that their position in life meant that there were many who were less fortunate than themselves and there was also a genuine desire at that time to give something back to the local community.

 

Dockland charity matches were arranged as part of the ongoing fundraising for these amenity centres and one such game was played out at the Boleyn Ground on St. Patrick’s Day 1924 (17 March) between West Ham and Tottenham Hotspur.

The occasion was honoured by the presence of H.R.H. the Duke of York, who, according to a newspaper report of the event "was heartily cheered by the crowd when he drove up to the ground in his motor."

 

The charity match brought an instant response from the locals and a crowd of about 10,000 turned up. The play was much above the average usually seen in "friendly" encounters with the two centre-halves George Kay for the Hammers and Billy Sage for Tottenham being prominent throughout. In the first half West Ham did most of the attacking with the Hammers' wingers Edwards and Ruffell showing their skills. However, much against the run of play the Spurs took the lead just before the interval following a free-kick. In the second half Tottenham played some crisp football and although the Hammers' had some chances they could not reduce their arrears until two minutes from time when Jack Young equalised from the penalty spot following a foul on William Edwards.

Glass Shelftop

Dockland Settlements

With the match concluding in a 1-1 draw, the Duke presented this gold medal to West Ham first-team trainer Charlie Paynter and similar ones given to the rest of the home players, however Tottenham had to wait a few days to receive theirs.

 

After the game the match ball was auctioned, and Mr. W. White, the West Ham United chairman secured it for 50 guineas (£52.50p) on behalf of the fund. The gate receipts were £385, with the North London club making the total amount up to £450.

Trophy Cabinet

Grand Stand Opens

1925 Plaque

The season opened on 29 August 1925 with a visit from Manchester United who were newly-promoted from the Second Division behind Champions Leicester City.

 

The West Ham United board unveiled the new ‘Grand Stand’ on the west side of the stadium which was funded by proceeds received from reaching the first-ever FA Cup Final at Wembley Stadium and promotion to the first Division in 1923, the stand quickly became known as the West Stand.

 

Designed by Sir E.O. Williams and D.J. Moss the construction was undertaken by the family building company W.J. Cearns and provided seats for 4,800 fans and cover for a further 10,000 standing. An attendance of 25,630 saw the ‘Red Devils’ lose by the only goal scored by Stanley Earle.

Glass Shelftop

Grand Stand

25_08_29 WHU v. Manchester United 01